Local coronavirus rules explained

The flag of Baden-Württemberg flies above Villa Reitzenstein, the official seat of the state premier, in Stuttgart. Photo by Bardia Khajenoori, USAG Stuttgart Public Affairs.

USAG Stuttgart Public Affairs

This page has been updated to reflect new rules and relaxations effective June 28.

This information is provided as a courtesy to the Stuttgart military community, focusing on the most relevant aspects to our community, and is not authoritative. For full, official details in German, see the Corona Ordinance page on the state government website.

Shops and services continue to reopen in local communities due to decreased incidence rates. What exactly is open, and under which conditions, depends on the community and its incidence rate; thresholds exist at 100 (the “emergency break” level), 50, 35, and 10. Relaxations occur after five days in a lower incidence level, and stricter rules apply after five days in the next higher incidence level.

In effect, this means you may be able to dine at a restaurant or visit an outdoor pool without a test or vaccine proof in one local community, but not another. If possible, check on current requirements before visiting somewhere to avoid surprises.

The full list of requirements for different types of activities/services and each incidence level is currently only provided in German, but is available here.

A medical-grade mask that covers your mouth and nose is required to patronize off-post retail stores in the state of Baden-Württemberg, effective January 25. Effective April 24, an FFP2/N95/KN95 mask is required in public transportation when community seven-day-incidence is above 100—otherwise, any medical grade mask is sufficient.

Children five-years-old or younger are exempt from the mask requirement. Masks should be worn not only inside stores and malls, but also within their parking lots.

Non-medical masks are still acceptable for use on post when required, except where stated otherwise (e.g. during appointments in barbershops and beauty salons, when a medical mask is required). Specifics on mask policy are available here.


”Local

Exemptions for Fully Vaccinated or Recovered Individuals

Effective May 9, fully vaccinated or recently recovered people are treated in the same manner as people who have tested negative for COVID-19 in situations in which a negative test is required for access to locations or services, and are exempted from certain other measures in place.

“Fully vaccinated” is defined as having received the final dose in a series (dose two for Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, or the single dose for the Janssen/Johnson and Johnson vaccine) at least fourteen days prior, and “recovered” individuals are those who can provide proof of a positive PCR test that is at least 28 days old, but no more than six months old.

Those who fall into one of these categories are not subject to limits on the number of people in private gatherings and are exempt from curfew restrictions in place during an active “emergency break” period. A vaccination card takes the place of a negative test where they are required to shop or visit a hairdresser, zoo, or museum, for example. Mask wear and distancing requirements remain in effect for fully vaccinated and recovered people off-post.

Be prepared to offer proof of vaccination or recovery status (e.g., original or copy of vaccination card with both doses delivered at least fourteen days prior) to a shopkeeper or police officer if necessary for this purpose.


Contact restrictions

In counties with a stable seven day incidence rate of less than 10, up to 25 people can meet.

In counties with a stable seven day incidence rate of 10-50, no more than 15 people from four different households* can meet. The children of these households, and up to five other children from other households up to (and including) age 13, do not count toward the limit.

In counties with a stable incidence rate of between 50 and 100, five people from two households can meet.

*Fully vaccinated and recovered people do not count toward the limits, and couples are considered to be a single household even if they do not live together.

Contact restrictions are tightened in communities where the seven day incidence is above 100 (i.e., with an active “emergency break”), to one household being able to meet with no more than one member of another household.

Effective March 29, occupants of private vehicles must wear surgical or FFP2/KN95/N95 masks if someone not of the household is in the vehicle.


Mask Requirements

A medical-grade (surgical, FFP2, N95, KN95) mask that covers your mouth and nose is required to patronize off-post retail stores in the state of Baden-Württemberg, effective January 25. Effective May 26, medical masks or FFP2/N95/KN95 masks are required on public transportation when a community’s incidence rate exceeds 100 for several days and an “emergency break” is in place–otherwise, any medical grade mask is sufficient. Fully vaccinated or recovered people are currently not exempt from the mask wear requirement.

Children five-years-old or younger are exempt from the mask requirement.

Non-medical masks are still acceptable for use on post for those who are not fully vaccinated, or where masks continue to be required. Specifics on mask policy are available here.

Masks must be worn in public transit (both inside vehicles and at indoor stations/stops) and inside shops and shopping centers, as well as in their parking lots.

Effective March 29, occupants of private vehicles must wear surgical or FFP2/KN95/N95 masks if someone not of the household is in the vehicle.


Collection of personal data for contact tracing

Applicable during non-lockdown periods

Visiting restaurants, museums, and similar places typically requires providing personal data such as name, address, and phone number/email address to facilitate contact tracing in the event of an outbreak at that time and location.

Individuals who refuse to provide this information will be denied entry to the location, and providing false information is punishable by a fine.

Data protection laws require this information to be strictly safeguarded and used for the sole purpose of providing information to the public health department or local police authority in accordance with legal requirements in the event of an outbreak. The data is stored for four weeks and then deleted; the law requires that unauthorized persons do not have access to the records.