Break the bad habit of distracted driving

Driving DistractionsDirectorate of Communication and Public Affairs
U.S. Army Combat Readiness/ Safety Center Fort Rucker, Ala.

Distracted driving isn’t a man or woman thing. How many times have you watched someone — regardless of gender — eat, shave, do their hair, read, text, talk or play with a cellphone or otherwise find things to occupy their time behind the wheel? Is it that driving has become so boring, or maybe some folks are just trying to be masters of multitasking?

Here are some distracted driving tips from Farm Bureau Insurance to keep you on the straight and narrow.

• Change your ways and recognize the activities that distract you, such as eating, talking on the phone or changing a CD. Once you recognize these distractions, you can work to eliminate them.

• Make a plan. Know your route in advance and make sure you clearly understand your directions. Check the weather and road conditions. If you’re traveling with children, ensure they are properly buckled up and you have items to keep them occupied, such as books on tape or soft toys.

• Manage your time so you don’t have to multitask or drive aggressively on the road.

• Don’t let your drive time become your downtime. Driving isn’t the time to catch up on phone calls, personal grooming or dining.

• Scan the roadway to ensure you’re aware of others at all times. Be prepared for other drivers to be unpredictable.

• Concentrate on your driving. Make sure you’re not upset or tired when getting on the road. This is not the time to have a serious or emotional conversation with your passengers.

• Pull over in a safe place if you need to do something that will take your eyes and/or mind off the road.

• Use technology sensibly.

• Take a refresher class. Everyone can pick up bad habits through the years. A driver improvement course can raise your awareness and help you assess your driving behaviors.

• Buckle up, every trip and every time.

According to the National Safety  Council, thousands die needlessly each year because people continue to use their cell phones while driving. With the number of people dying in crashes involving a distracted driver on the rise — 3,331 in 2011 compared to 3,267 in 2010 — safety officials are determined to educate people on the dangers of distracted driving.
According to the National Safety
Council, thousands die needlessly each year because people continue to use their cell phones while driving.
With the number of people dying in crashes involving a distracted driver on the rise — 3,331 in 2011 compared to 3,267 in 2010 — safety officials are determined to educate people on the dangers of distracted driving.

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